Exercise Science

If you enjoy health and exercise and want to help others achieve personal goals and improve quality of life, a degree in exercise science may be the right choice for you. Exercise science is a multidisciplinary area of study that combines biological, physical and health sciences to understand the human body and how it responds to movement through exercise and sport. In this field you’ll work with people of all ages and abilities to improve their physical health and wellbeing.

Our program prepares you to work in a variety of health and fitness professions including personal training, health club management, coaching, strength and conditioning, clinical health education and rehabilitation. And, if you’re looking to continue your education, you’ll be prepared for certification exams and graduate levels of study in exercise science or other health-related disciplines such as athletic training, medicine, physical therapy and physician assistant.

“Professors are your best resources for success in challenging courses.”
— Collin Christensen '18

Read Collin's story

About the Exercise Science program

Combine your interests in health and science to help others remain healthy, active and achieve personal goals.

Carroll University’s Exercise Science major is truly interdisciplinary and combines science, nutrition and fitness courses to prepare you for any career in exercise science. You’ll take basic science classes such as chemistry and biology to teach you how the body works and then move onto applied science courses like exercise physiology to learn about the body in motion and application courses which will teach you the skills needed to become an exercise scientist.

The majority of your classes involve hands-on experiences—for example, you’ll work with your peers to test heart rate, blood pressure and skin fold and also be able to apply these practices to some of our NCAA Division III student athletes. You’ll also look at the relationship between chemistry and nutrition, to understand how the foods we eat affect and improve health and performance. And if you’re most interested in how the body moves, you’ll learn what happens inside each of us when we run, jump or contract a muscle.

In addition to learning about the typically active and healthy body, you’ll gain a basic understanding of populations who have different medical conditions. Any career you choose in exercise science may encounter clients or patients dealing with issues such as stroke recovery, diabetes or cardiopulmonary disease. The courses you take will help prepare you to handle these situations successfully.

Learn more about the Exercise Science major

Internships

We help you build real world experience, explore careers and network with professionals through internship opportunities. Recent placements include the following companies:

  • Wisconsin Athletic Club
  • Quad/Graphics Inc.
  • YMCA
  • Westwood Fitness Center
  • Milwaukee Bucks
  • The Cooper Institute (Dallas, Texas)
  • University of Minnesota
  • San Jose State University

Careers

College is a big investment in a bright future. Learn more about the industries and careers our majors pursue, and the workplaces and experiences of the alumni from our program. See where yours may take you.

More Resources

“Every course I've taken has given me useful tools to carry with me.”
— Tad Taggart '18

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Meet the Faculty

Dr. Jessica Brown

Dr. Jessica Brown

Assistant Professor of Exercise Science - Applied Clinical Practice




Brian Edlbeck

Brian Edlbeck

Clinical Assistant Professor of Exercise Science and Exercise Physiology




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Dr. Jamie Krzykowski

Clinical Assistant Professor of Athletic Training and Exercise Physiology




David MacIntyre

David MacIntyre

Clinical Associate Professor of Exercise Science




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Jason Roe

Senior Lecturer in Exercise Science




Dr. Daniel Shackelford

Dr. Daniel Shackelford

Assistant Professor of Exercise Science




Dr. Timothy Suchomel

Dr. Timothy Suchomel

Assistant Professor of Exercise Science




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