David MacIntyre Photo

David MacIntyre

Clinical Associate Professor of Exercise Science and Chair of the Department of Human Movement Sciences 262.524.7667 macintyr@carrollu.edu Charles Street Hall 301

TEACHES IN THE FOLLOWING PROGRAM(S)

Exercise Science

Biography

David MacIntyre was born and grew up in Waukesha, WI, attending Waukesha North for high school. His parents, Bruce MacIntyre ’63 and Kathy (Couillard) MacIntyre ’64, graduated from Carroll College and both have worked at Carroll; his dad taught in the Biology Department (1968-2005) and his mom supervised student teachers (mid-late 1970’s). An early “job” of David’s was as ball boy for the Carroll Football team. MacIntyre received a BS in Physics from Hope College and an MS in Exercise and Sport Science from Penn State University. He started working at Carroll in August, 1995. MacIntyre has taught Biomechanics in the Physical Therapy Graduate Program, Introductory Physics in the Physics Department, Kinesiology in the Department of Human Movement Sciences, and Sports Biomechanics in the Exercise Physiology Graduate Program. Additionally, he has served as Computer Consultant for Physical Therapy, Exercise Science Program Coordinator, and Women’s volleyball coach (1997-2001 seasons).

Education

  • Pennsylvania State University, M.S. in Exercise and Sport Science, 1995
  • Hope College, B.S. in Physics, 1992

Areas of Specialization

Biomechanics; Locomotion Studies

Scholarly and Professional Achievements

Manuscripts


Scharl, C. and MacIntyre, D.  (2012). “Force and Time Comparison of the Sprint Start Using Traditional Down Blocks and Moyé Blocks.”  Track & Cross Country Journal.  2 (2); 225-232.

Blievernicht, J, Sullivan, K, and Erickson, M.  (2012). “Outcomes Following Kinesthetic Feedback for Gait Training in a Direct Access Environment: A Case Report on Social Wellness in Relation to Gait Impairment.”  Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, 28 (4), 326-332.  (Contributor: MacIntyre, D)

MacIntyre, D. B.  (1995).  The Effect of Different Walking Speeds on the Range of Motion of the First Metatarsophalangeal Joint (Master’s thesis). The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA.
 

Research Presentations


Edlbeck, B. and MacIntyre, D. B. “Comparison of Vertical Jump Measurement Techniques.”  National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) National Conference, Poster presentation; Providence, Rhode Island.  July 2012.

Erickson, M. and MacIntyre, D. B. “Changes in Shoulder Girdle Range of Motion and Kinesthetic Perception Using Functional Integration.”  American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) Annual Conference and Exposition, Poster presentation; Tampa, FL.  June 6-9, 2012.

Edlbeck, B. and MacIntyre, D. B. “Comparison of Muscle Electromyography During Walking on a Motorized and Non-Motorized Treadmill.”  National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) National Conference, Poster presentation; Las Vegas, Nevada.  July 2011.


Student Collaboration Poster Presentations


38 posters accepted for American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) Annual Conference and Exposition; 2007-2013

PT 2009 Annual Conference and Exposition of the American Physical Therapy Association's Abstract Recognition of Excellence award winner: Kreutzer, J, Sullivan, K, Erickson, M, Shields, K, and MacIntyre, D.  “Outcomes Following Kinesthetic Biofeedback for Gait Training in a Direct Access Environment: A Unique Case Study.”  American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) Annual Conference and Exposition, Poster presentation; Baltimore, MD.  June 10-13, 2009.

31 posters accepted for Wisconsin Physical Therapy Association (WPTA) Spring Conference; 2007-2012
  • 3 First places – Case Study Category
  • 2 Second places – Case Study Category
  • 3 Honorable mentions – Case Study Category

Memberships

American Society of Biomechanics, 1994-2002, 2007-Present

Sigma Pi Sigma, National Physics Honor Society, 1992-Present

American College of Sports Medicine, 2007-2012

International Society of Biomechanics, 1994-1998

Service to Carroll University and Profession

Carroll University

  • Chair, Department of Human Movement Sciences, 2018-present
  • Faculty President, 2017-2018
  • Clinical Faculty Promotion Committee (CFPC) chair, 2016-2017
  • Clinical Faculty Executive Committee (CFEC) chair, 2015-2017
  • Faculty Development Leadership Team member, 2015-2016
  • Exercise Science Program Coordinator, 2013-2015
  • Exercise Science major Program Review Coordinator, 2011-2012
  • Clinical Faculty Executive Committee (CFEC) member, 2010
  • Tenure and Promotion (T&P) committee member, 2013-2015
  • Freshman Move-In Day participant; 2008, 2010, 2012, 2013, 2016
  • General Education Committee Summer Design Team member, May-September, 2008
  • President's Task Force on Athletics member, March-August, 2008
  • Faculty Executive Committee (FEC) member, Fall 2004-Spring 2013
  • Freshman Preview Day Registration Advisor, 2004-2014
  • Freshmen Early Registration and Orientation Advisor, 2004-2016
  • Department of Athletics Captain Council Task Force, 1999-2000
  • Spring Fling Forum Task Force, 1999-2000

Why do you do what you do?

I like to show students how understanding mechanics (physics) can allow them to help other people function in their daily activities.

How do you make learning engaging?

I teach kinesiology, the study of human motion. I try to make the material engaging by having students demonstrate and analyze different motions of the body, such as strength training and exercise motions, sport-related motions, and activities of daily living.

What should students know about you?

I have two sons who play baseball and football. I’ve coached their baseball teams for 12 years. I was a physics major in college. I played volleyball, basketball, and ran track in high school. I’ve been in marching band, school plays, and church musicals. I play trombone and piano. I’ve traveled to Jordan, Israel, and Egypt for a college course titled “Three Faces of Faith.” I was on a volleyball mission trip with Athletes in Action to the Philippines.

pano of main campus