cynthia horst photo

Dr. Cynthia Horst

Associate Professor of Biology 262.524.7499 chorst@carrollu.edu Rankin Hall 103

TEACHES IN THE FOLLOWING PROGRAM(S)

Biology

Education

  • Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology, Postdoctoral fellow, Cell Biology, 1989-1994
  • Emory University, Ph.D. in Anatomy and Cell Biology, 1989
  • Goshen College, B.A. in Biology, 1982

Areas of Specialization

Establishment and maintenance of cell shape, cell biology, molecular biology and genetics

Scholarly and Professional Achievements

Achievements

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Carroll University, 2001-2003

Associate Professor of Biology, Carroll University, 2000-present

Director of New Visions: Supporting Women as Scientists. This 3M Corporation funded program employs women science majors to develop and implement hands-on, investigatory experiments for 5th and 6th grade classrooms, 1995-2002    

Assistant Professor of Biology, Carroll University, 1994-2000

Publications


Boyd, J.S., M. M. Gray, M. D. Thompson, C. J. Horst, and C. L. Dieckmann,  2011. The Daughter Four-Membered Microtubule Rootlet Determines Anterior–Posterior Positioning of the Eyespot in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Cytoskeleton 68:459–469.

Lewis, S.E., L.Conley and C. Horst, 2003. Structuring Research Opportunities for All Biology Majors, Bioscene. 29:9-14.

Horst, C.J., D.J. Fishkind, G.J. Pazour and G.B. Witman, 1999. An insertional mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with defective microtubule positioning. Cell Motil. Cytoskel. 44:143-154.

Horst, C.J. and G.B. Witman, 1995. Reactivation of Chlamydomonas Cell Models. In: Methods in Cell Biology. Cilia and Flagella. Ed. W. Dentler. Academic Press. pp 207-210.
 

Presentations at Professional Meetings

Haven, M. C., A. L. Ambrose, C. J. Horst, 2011. Genetic and physical characterization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant strain cmu1-1. American Society for Cell Biology Annual Meeting. Denver, CO.

Horst, C.J. 2010. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cmu1-1 (cytoplasmic microtubules unorganized) mutant strain shows altered sensitivity to microtubule-stabilizing and microtubule-destabilizing drugs. American Society for Cell Biology Annual Meeting. Philadelphia, PA.

*Abbasi, I and C. Horst, 2010. Timing of Hatching and Flagellar Resorption in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and cmu1-1. Beta Beta Beta National Biological Honor Society Biannual meeting, Durango, CO.

Runnoe, A., N. Robinson and C.J. Horst, 2010. Comparing susceptibility of wild-type Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and mutant cmu1-1 cells to the microtubule-stabilizing drug taxol. Beta Beta Beta National Biological Honor Society Biannual meeting, Durango, CO.

Klimek, A. and C. J. Horst, 2009. Growth rate is reduced and optical density increased in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii microtubule-organization mutant strain cmu1-1 . American Society for Cell Biology Annual Meeting. San Diego, CA.

Roever, K. and C.J. Horst, 2008, Microarray Analysis used to Identify Gene Deleted by Insertional Mutagenesis in the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant strain cmu1-1. National Beta Beta Beta  Biological Honor Society Biannual Meeting.

Horst, C., 2006. "From Cob to Corporation:" A Seemingly Simple Genetics Laboratory that Requires Complex Problem Solving. Association of College and University Biology Educators, Milliken University, Decatur, IL

Horst, C. and S, Lewis, 2006. Enhancing Student Learning by Creating a Monitored Core Curriculum Coupled to Faculty Development. Project Kaleidoscope National Assembly, Chicago, IL

Horst, C. and S, Lewis, 2006. Research for all Students. Project Kaleidoscope National Assembly, Chicago, IL

27 presentations while at Carroll University, 16 have included student authors. Bold indicates student author; * indicates won award.

Service to Carroll University and Profession

Institutional Service

  • Student/Faculty Ethics Committee, Carroll University, 2012-present
  • General and Cross Cultural Education Committee, Carroll University, 2011-2012
  • Chair, International and Off-Campus Program Committee, Carroll University, 2006-2008
  • International and Off-Campus Program Committee, Carroll University, 2005-2011
  • Academic Steering Committee, Carroll College, 1998-2001
  • General Education Committee, Carroll College, 1997-2004
  • Chair, Liberal Studies Task Force, Carroll College, 1996-1997
  • Curriculum Committee, Carroll College, 1995-1996

Professional Service

  • Reviewer for Gravitational and Space Research, 2014
  • Editorial Board for Bioscene, 2004-2007
  • Reviewer for Bioscene and Planta, 2002
  • North Central Association, Accreditation Self Study Team, 2000-2002
  • Steering Committee, Association of College and University Biology Educators, 1999-2002
  • President, Women in Science of Southeastern Wisconsin, 1999-2001
  • Reviewer, National Science Foundation Grants, 1999
  • Chair, Academic Steering Committee Subcommittee on Academic Integrity, 1999
  • Advisor, Beta Beta Beta Biological Honor Society, Mu Chapter, 1998-2014

Honors and Awards

Honors

  • Beta Beta Beta National Biological Honor Society Yokley Outstanding Faculty Advisor Award, 2012
  • Beta Beta Beta National Biological Honor Society Yokley Outstanding Faculty Advisor Award, 2010

Grants Awarded

  • 18 funded grant applications, both local and national.
  • 20 funded student research grant applications to BBB National Biological Honor Society.
  • “Generation of VPS39 rescued strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant strain cmu1-1” Funded by Carroll University Faculty Development, 2015
  • “DNA sequence determination of VPS39 gene.” Funded by Carroll University Faculty Development, 2013
  • “Identification of defective gene in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant strain cmu1-1 that results in altered microtubule position and function”.  Funded by Carroll University Faculty Development, 2010
  • “Emerging research methodologies: Bringing microarrays to Carroll.”  Funded by Carroll University Faculty Development, 2009

What is your teaching style?

Science courses are widely known for presenting students with a barrage of facts and definitions to memorize-much of which is soon forgotten. Rather than simply presenting information, my goal is for students to engage with biology in a way that fosters integration of new information and provides opportunities for students to practice application of knowledge.

Why do you do what you do?

I think biology is fascinating. Being able to share that love on a daily bases is a dream come true. Because our understanding of the biological world is ever changing, I get to continually explore those changes and seek innovative ways of weaving new concepts into the classroom. Although engaging with groups of students in a classroom is a major part of my job, some of the best moments come during one-on-one interactions when a student is struggling with a concept and suddenly reaches that ah ha moment when they say “I get it”.

How do you make learning engaging?

I strive to provide multiple approaches for students to learn. These approaches vary significantly between 100 level courses where we are building a base of knowledge and skills necessary to be successful in college and 400 level courses where we are struggling with complex biological concepts and the skills necessary for graduate school and the workforce. I use layered assessment so students can continually gauge their progress. In introductory courses, I incorporate “clicker” questions during class, allowing me to assess student understanding before proceeding to another topic, and frequent quizzes that students take both individually and in groups, allowing students to assess their progress as well as peer educate. In upper level courses, I employ assignments that parallel what students will be asked to do in graduate programs and the workforce such as group projects and in-depth student-led presentations.

What should students know about you?

I came to Carroll because I wanted to teach at a liberal arts school where I could get to know my students, where they would learn not only the mysteries of biology but be encouraged to be curious about all life has to offer, from cell biology to philosophy and culture. Although Carroll has evolved over the years, and students have changed over the years, I am ever encouraged by Carroll’s ability to maintain those core values and student’s enthusiasm to embrace them.

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