Dr. Melissa Strzelinski

Clinical Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy 262.524.7670 mstrzeli@carrollu.edu Physical Therapy Building 109A

TEACHES IN THE FOLLOWING PROGRAM(S)

Physical Therapy

Biography

Dr. Strzelinski brings over 10 years of experience in the realm of orthopedic, sport and dance medicine physical therapy and research to Carroll University. She has extensive experience treating pre-professional through professional dancers, including dancers and performers from the Joffrey Ballet, River North Dance Chicago, Broadway in Chicago productions and the Colorado Ballet. Her research interests involve earlier identification of hip pathology in dancers. Dr. Strzelinski has presented her research internationally and nationally as part of the International Association for Dance Medicine and Science (IADMS) Annual Meeting, the American Physical Therapy Association’s Annual Combined Sections Meeting and the Chicago Sports Medicine Symposium.

Education

  • Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions: Doctor of Philosophy – Orthopaedic and Sports Science (2018)
  • University of Wisconsin – Madison: Master of Physical Therapy (2008)
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison: Bachelor of Science, Journalism (2001)
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison: Bachelor of Science, Dance (2001)

Areas of Specialization

  • Dance Medicine
  • Foot and Ankle
  • Hip Arthroscopy
  • Manual Therapy 
  • Orthopedics
  • Sports

Scholarly and Professional Achievements

Publications

Chala J, Mitchell J, Pascual-Garrido C, Briggs K, Philippon M. Hip Arthroscopy: from Basic Skills to Advanced Techniques – Chapter: Clinical rehabilitation guidelines following hip arthroscopy. Published as e-book on iTunes. Released September 8, 2016. Steadman Philippon Research Institute, Vail, CO.

Kokmeyer D, Strzelinski M, Lehecka BJ. Gait considerations in patients with femoroacetabular impingement. Int J Sports Phys Ther. Nov 2014;9(6):827-838.

Lectures/Presentations    

The Influence of Hip Pain on Muscle Performane in Dancers – American Physical Therapy Association Combined Sections MeetingWashington, D.C. – January 2019

Rehabilitation for Extra-Articular Hip Pathology; Pearls and Pitfalls for Post-Op Hip Arthroscopy and Hip Disorders; Rehabilitation after Hip Arthroscopy – Chicago Sports Medicine Symposium – Chicago, IL – September 2018

Reliability of the Dyna Rail: Novel Handheld Dynamometry Stabilization Device – Poster Presentation – American Physical Therapy Association Combined Sections Meeting - New Orleans, LA – February 2018

Non-surgical and surgical management of the complicated hip: Biomechanical and functional considerations - International Association for Dance Medicine and Science Annual Meeting - Houston, TX – October 2017

Reliability of the Dyna Rail: Novel Handheld Dynamometry Stabilization Device - International Association for Dance Medicine and Science Annual Meeting - Houston, TX – October 2017

Howard Head Sports Medicine: Sports Physical Therapy Residency Program: Hip Unit – lecture, lab and journal club – Vail, CO - September 2017

Hip and Shoulder Love: A Yoga and Anatomy Workshop – Aria Athletic Club – Vail, CO – March 2017

The Complicated Hip: A New Debate – American Physical Therapy Association Combined Sections Meeting – Anaheim, CA – February 2016

Reaching New Heights: A Dance-Specific Plyometric Training program following ACL Reconstruction in a University Dancer – International Association for Dance Medicine and Science Annual Meeting - Pittsburgh, PA – October 2015

Greater Trochanteric Apophysitis in a Young Dancer: A Differential Diagnosis Dilemma – Poster Presentation - International Association for Dance Medicine and Science Annual Meeting – Basel, Switzerland – October 2014

Greater Trochanteric Apophysitis in a young dancer – Athletico Performing Arts CEU 2014

Lower Extremity Assessment: A systematic, function specific approach – Athletico Performing Arts CEU 2013

Dance medicine lecturer to pre-professional dancers throughout Chicago (2009-2014)

Service to Carroll University and Profession

  • Reviewer, Journal of Dance Medicine and Science: 2015-present
  • Member, International Association for Dance Medicine and Science: 2012-present
  • Member, American Physical Therapy Association (Sports and Orthopaedic Sections): 2006-present

 

Honors and Awards

  • 2018: Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions 2018 Student Scholar
  • 2014: International Association for Dance Medicine and Science Marjorie Moore Student Researcher Award
  • 2008: Wisconsin Physical Therapy Association Chris Crivello Service Award
  • 2008: University of Wisconsin-Madison Margaret Kohli Scholarship 
  • 2007: Wisconsin Physical Therapy Fund Scholarship 

What is your teaching style?

My classroom invites learning by experience and influences a zest for active learning, whether or not the students recognize the moment learning occurs. My philosophy takes form in the analogy of a trampoline. The classroom exists as the trampoline itself, a bouncing board for thoughts, ideas and experiential or observational learning. The students can expect a functional, safe, yet playful environment for learning. As the facilitator of learning, I will ensure the springs are taut, the frame is secure and there are no holes in the jumping surface. I will hold the authority to maintain order and ensure safety of participation. In return, I will expect openness and willingness to allow learning to occur – that individuals will jump, bounce or even sit on the trampoline, secondarily exposed to content by association. 

Why do you do what you do?

The unrelenting quest of life-long learning in my own academic and professional journey led me to teaching. My desire to enrich the exposure to and experience of physical therapy education guides my intention to serve as a facilitator of learning, while continually learning from the students in front of me.

How do you make learning engaging?

I provide an engaging classroom that promotes inquiry and the critical, independent thinking necessary for future application. Students are challenged to expand their understanding and integration of material into actual scenarios, whether created within the classroom or experienced outside the classroom walls. This engagement requires preparation on the student’s part as background readings completed before class and actually showing up to class. I employ answer and return questioning strategies, student dialogues and debates. I believe class time is better spent clarifying, digesting, and applying information, rather than solely focusing on first-time exposure to new material.

What should students know about you?

Students should know that professionally, I approach my classroom with transparency, laying all cards on the table to avoid surprises or disappointments along the way. I believe identifying myself as the facilitator of learning, but a simultaneous learner myself bridges the gap between teacher and learner, and establishes an environment of trust.

Personally, I practice what I preach as a physical therapist! I am committed to exemplifying a healthy lifestyle – I enjoy skiing, hiking, cycling, stand up paddle board, yoga, being outside any chance I can get, traveling, photography and cooking. 

pano of main campus