abby markwyn photo

Dr. Abigail Markwyn

Associate Professor of History 262.524.7275 amarkwyn@carrollu.edu Explorer House 103

TEACHES IN THE FOLLOWING PROGRAM(S)

History

Education

  • University of Wisconsin-Madison, Ph.D. in History, 2006
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison, M.A in History, 2000
  • Carleton College, B.A., Cum Laude with distinction in History, 1995

Areas of Specialization

Gender and Race in the United States, American Indian History, Western United States History, California History, The history of World’s Fairs, Latin America (teaching field)

Scholarly and Professional Achievements

Books

 
Empress San Francisco: The Pacific Rim, the Great West, and California at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition. University of Nebraska Press. 2014.

Gendering the Fair: Histories of Women and Gender at World’s Fairs, co-edited with Tracey Jean Boisseau. University of Illinois Press. 2010.
 

Articles and Chapters

 
“Beyond the End of the Trail: Indians at San Francisco’s 1915 World’s Fair.” Ethnohistory. Ethnohistory. 63:2. April 2016
 
“Queen of the Joy Zone Meets Hercules: Gendering Imperial California at the Panama-Pacific
International Exposition” Western Historical Quarterly. 47:1. February 2016.
 
“Fair Labor: The Work of Constructing an Ideal Pacific City.” Boom: A Journal of California. Spring 2015.
 
“Encountering ‘Woman’ on the Fairgrounds of the 1915 Panama-Pacific Exposition,” in Boisseau and Markwyn, Gendering the Fair.  2010.
 
“World’s Fairs in Feminist Historical Perspective,” with Tracey Jean Boisseau, in Boisseau and Markwyn, Gendering the Fair.  2010.
 
“Economic Partner and Exotic Other: China and Japan at San Francisco’s Panama-Pacific International Exposition." Western Historical Quarterly.  Winter 2008.
 

Selected Book Reviews and Short Articles

 
Review of Curtis M. Hinsley and David R. Wilcox, eds. Coming of Age in Chicago: The 1893 World’s Fair and the Coalescence of American Anthropology. University of Nebraska Press, 2015. Pacific Historical Review. 2016.
 
Review of Bruce G. Harvey, World’s Fairs in a Southern Accent: Atlanta, Nashville, and Charleston, 1895-1902. Knoxville. University of Tennessee Press, 2014.American Historical Review. Spring 2016.
 
Review of Alan McPherson, The Invaded: How Latin Americans and Their Allies Fought and Ended U.S. Occupations. Summer 2015. H-NET. https://www.h-net.org/reviews/showpdf.php?id=41783

“The Chicago Columbian Exposition.” Imperialism and Expansionism in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia. ABC-Clio. 2015
 
“World’s Fairs.” Imperialism and Expansionism in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia. ABC-Clio. 2015.
 
Review of American Heathens: Religion, Race, and Reconstruction in American History, Western Historical Quarterly. Spring 2014.
 
Review of Women Building History: Public Art at the 1893 Columbian Exposition, Journal of American History. 2013.
 
Review of Plague, Fear, and the Politics in San Francisco's Chinatown, Western Historical Quarterly. 2013.
 
Review of Women and the Everyday City: Public Space in San Francisco, 1890-1915, Planning Perspectives, 27:2, 337-338.
Review of The Children of Chinatown: Growing up Chinese American in San Francisco 1850-1920. Western Historical Quarterly. Winter 2010.
 
Review of Seaway to the Future: American Social Visions and the Construction of the Panama Canal. American Studies. 49. Fall/Winter 2009.
 
“The Chicago Fire.” The Old West History and Heritage, Vol. 2. Edward Countryman, ed. Marshall Cavendish. 2009.
 

Public Presentations and Conference Papers

 
“World’s Fairs in American History.” 2016 Wisconsin Great Lakes Social Studies Conference. Madison, WI. March 2016.
 
“Imagining Pacific Unity at the ‘World’s Fair of the West:’ San Francisco, 1939.” Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association Annual Meeting.  Seattle. March 2016.
 
“Performing and Debating Indianness: Native Peoples at Chicago’s 1933 Century of Progress Exposition.” American Society for Ethnohistory. Las Vegas. November 2015.
 
“Images and Reality of Race and Gender at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition.” Petaluma Public Library, Petaluma, California. July 2015.
 
“Race, Gender and Labor at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition.” Invited Presentation to San Francisco City Guides. July 2015.
 
“Beyond the “End of the Trail”: American Indians at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition.” California Historical Society. July 2015.
 
Keynote Address, University of Wisconsin-Waukesha, Student Research Symposium, April 2015.
 
“Women, the City and 1915.” Panel Participant. California Historical Society. March 2015
 
“Performing Work: Laboring at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition.” Sonoma State Univeristy. March 2015.
 
“Claiming Citizenship: Ethnic and Racial Communities at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition.” Sonoma County Museum/ Sonoma County Library. March 2015.
 
“Spectacle, Identity, and Citizenship: Bay Area Ethnic and Racial Communities at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition.” San Francisco Public Library. March 2015.
 
“Exhibiting Modern Womanhood in San Antonio: The Woman’s Pavilion at HemisFair ’68.” The World’s Fair Since ’64. Lemelson Center, Smithsonian, Washington, DC. October 2014.
 
“Claiming Citizenship and Heritage: Bay Area Ethnic Communities at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition.” American Association for the Advancement of Science – Pacific Division. Riverside, CA. June 2014.
 
“Gendered Visions of California at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition.” Western History Association. Phoenix, AZ. October 2013.
 
“Not Always a ‘Vanishing Race:” Real and Imagined Indians at San Francisco’s Panama-Pacific International Exposition. Western Association of Women Historians. Portland, OR. May 2013.
 
“From Co-Eds to Feminists: Second Wave Feminism on Milwaukee Area College Campuses,” Power, Politics & Performance in Women's Studies and LGBTQ Studies, 36th Annual Wisconsin Women’s Studies Conference, October 2012.
 
“Beyond Suffrage: Women’s Activism at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition,” Mid-America Conference on History, Springfield, MO September 2012.
 
Chair and commentator, “Imagining the Other: Constructions of Race and Gender in Celebrations of the Far West.” Western Association of Women’s Historians Annual Conference, Berkeley, CA, May 2012.
 
 “Boosterism, Ethnic Identity and Citizenship at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition.” Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting, Milwaukee, WI, April 2012.
 
"Experiencing Brazil first-hand: Perspectives from a Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminar." UW Waukesha Visions and Expressions Lecture Series February, 2012.
 
 “Women Take the Political Stage: Organized Women at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition.” UW-Milwaukee Women’s Studies Brown Bag Series, December 2011.
 
 “Beyond the ‘End of the Trail’: Native Americans at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition.” American Society for Ethnohistory Annual Conference, Pasadena, CA, October 2011.
 
“Do World’s Fairs Have a Gender?” at “Dissenting Scripts and Other Voices on the World’s Fair Stage,” sponsored by the Center for International Studies, University of Virginia, September 2011.
 
"Beyond 'Dainty Celestial' and 'Dusky Damsel,': Asian and Asian American Women at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition." Committee on Canadian Women's History Annual Meeting, Vancouver, BC, August 2010.
 
"Encountering 'Woman' at San Francisco's Panama-Pacific International Exposition," Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, April 2010

“Sexuality, Race and Asian American Women at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition,” 33rd Wisconsin Women’s Studies and 4th LGBTQ Conferences, Madison, Wisconsin, April 2009

“Chinese and Japanese Participation in the Panama-Pacific International Exposition.” Invited symposium participant at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science – Pacific Branch. Waimea, Hawai’i, June 2008
 
“What’s Pacific about the Panama-Pacific International Exposition?” Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association Annual Meeting. San Francisco, March 2008.
 
"Creating (and experiencing) Pacific Worlds at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition."
Pacific Worlds and American West Conference, Sponsored by the Center for the American West, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, February 2008.
 
“Reforming the Fair: Local Politics, Moral Reformers and Visions of Progressive-Era America at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition” Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association Annual Meeting. Boston, April 2007
 
“Inviting the Alien: Images and Reality of China and Japan at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition.”  World’s Fair Symposium, an Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting pre-conference, San Francisco, March 2005.
 
“Claiming their Place: Performance, Public Space and Citizenship at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition.” Panel sponsored by the Society of Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, at the American Historical Association Annual Meeting, Seattle, Washington, January 2005.
 
“Caught Between Employment and Education: The Challenges Facing the University of Wisconsin’s Teaching Assistants’ Association.” American Historical Association Annual Meeting, Boston, Massachusetts, January 2001.
 
“‘I like to be there in Berkeley’: Native American Women, Community and the Berkeley Outing Center.” Fifth Women’s West Conference: Gender, Race, Class and Region in the North American West. Pullman, Washington, July 2000.

Service to Carroll University and Profession

Institutional Service

  • Associate Professor of History, Carroll University, 2013-Present
  • Assistant Professor of History, Carroll University, 2006-2013
  • Lecturer in History, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, 2005
  • Instructor in History, Edgewood College, 2003-04
  • Chair, Student Faculty Ethics Committee, Spring 2015-present
  • History Program Student Recruitment Coordinator, 2015-present
  • Member, Student Faculty Ethics Committee, 2012-15
  • Member, Physical Therapy Search Committee, 2014
  • Member, CCE Code of Conduct Task Force, 2012
  • Member, Anatomy and Physiology Instructional Staff Search Committee, 2013
  • Co-Chair, Technology in Teaching and Learning Committee, Carroll University, 2010-11
  • Member, Carroll Student Scholars' Committee, Carroll University, 2007-08, 2010-12
  • Member, Search Committee, History Program, 2011, 2012
  • Chair, Carroll Student Scholars' Committee, Carroll University 2008-10
  • Member, Technology in Teaching and Learning Committee, Carroll University, 2008-10
  • Member, Search Committee, History Program, 2007, 2009, 2010
  • Member, State of Wisconsin Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission. 2008-09
  • Member, Liberal Studies Major Task Force, Carroll College, 2007-08
  • Hispanic Health and Human Service Program, U.S. Dept. of Education Grant Project Member, Carroll College, 2006-2007
  • Carroll College Admissions Office Faculty Blogger, 2006-2007
  • Women’s History Month Committee, History Department, UW-Whitewater, Spring 2006

Professional Service

  • Manuscript Reviewer, University of Nebraska Press. 2013-Present
  • Manuscript Reviewer, Oxford University Press. 2014-Present
  • Textbook Reviewer. Oxford University Press. 2011-Present
  • Project/Research Assistant, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Medical History and Bioethics, 2004
  • Researcher/Writer, Isthmus Architecture, Madison, Wisconsin, 2001-2002

Why do you do what you do?

I teach because I want to challenge my students to question what they think they know about history and the world. Along the way, I hope they learn the skills I teach: close, critical reading, clear, coherent writing and argumentation, and the ability to speak coherently and persuasively. Watching a student develop from a shy freshman to a confident senior is one of the greatest rewards of my profession.

How do you make learning engaging?

During the Spring 2017 semester, I started using a completely new approach to teaching: integrating role-playing games into my classroom. Drawing on the “Reacting to the Past” pedagogy developed at Barnard College, and now used nationwide, I immersed my students and myself into a series of games that demand them to take on the roles of historical characters, and to function and make decisions based on that person’s ideals and goals. It’s the best professional decision I’ve ever made and it’s reinvigorated my approach to teaching history. I haven’t neglected lectures, exams, or papers, but the addition of role playing offers students a completely new and exciting way to experience history.

pano of main campus