Carroll University

LCOnline

Learning Commons
Collaboration Spaces
Equipment Checkout
Graduate Support
Make It Happen
Math Center
Math 101 Coaches
Subject Tutoring
Supplemental Instruction
Workshops
Writing Lab
Writing Center
  Resources for Writers
Contact Us
Learning Commons
UNDERGRADUATE
GRADUATE
ACADEMIC RESOURCES
STUDENT SCHOLARS CENTER
INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION

Resources for Writers

There are many web-based resources to help you with your writing.  The Writing Center has compiled a list of their favorites.  We have included a list of links for handouts and video demos on specific issues, but please consider spending some time exploring these excellent websites about writing.

To find more resources about the topics below, click on the topic you're interested in.

Academic Writing 101

Structure & Transitions

Pre-writing & Brainstorming

Revision

Thesis Argument & Introduction

Grammar, Punctuation, & Style

Using Evidence From Your Sources

Citations

 

Academic Writing 101



What exactly is academic writing and how is it different than other forms of writing?    


A Short Guide to College Writing (University of Chicago)
What Is and Academic Paper? (Dartmouth College)

Pre-writing & Brainstorming


Before you write, make sure that you know enough about your topic and have generated enough ideas about it to bring depth and complexity to your assignment.

How To Do A Close Reading (Harvard)
Outlining (Purdue OWL)
Webbing (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Brainstorming (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Reverse Outlining (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Audience (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

Thesis Argument & Introduction


Everything you write needs to have a point.  These links will help you generate a thesis that is both specific and complex enough to generate an essay.

Writing a Thesis Statement (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
Developing a Thesis Statement (UNC)

Using Evidence From Your Sources


When we write, we enter an existing conversation about an idea or a topic.  Using evidence well demonstrates that you understand the work of others who have contributed to the conversation about your subject.

Successful vs. Unsuccessful Paraphrasing (UW Madison)
How to Quote a Source (UW Madison)
Tips for Evaluation Sources (Diana Hacker)
Quoting, Paraphrasing and Summarizing (Purdue)
Evidence (UNC)

Structure & Transitions


A well structured paper develops its main idea logically, with each point connected to the previous points.  These links will help you write your argument so that its logic is clear to your reader.

Flow (UNC)
Transitions (UNC)
Writing Transitions (Purdue)
Essay Structure (Harvard)

Revision


Our first thoughts are rarely our best thoughts.  Good writing requires that we revise our initial ideas and impressions so that our best ideas are clear to our audience.

Revising Drafts (UNC)
Editing the Essay: Part I and II (Harvard)
Part I
Part II
Cultivating a Critical Eye (Dartmouth)

Grammar, Punctuation, & Style


Grammar and punctuation errors interfere with the clarity of our papers and suggest that we have not prepared our work for submission.  Carefully proofreading indicates to your audience that you care about work.

Reading Aloud (UNC)
Proofreading (UNC)
Twelve Common Errors (UW-Madison)
Grammar Girl: Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing

Citations

Carroll University Citation Help

LearningCommons

 

Learning Commons • 100 N. East Ave. • Waukesha, WI
Lower level of CU Library • 262.524.7313
FacebookEmailUsLCOnline

 
 Copyright © 2014 Carroll University, Waukesha, Wisconsin. All rights reserved. Top of Page