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Academic Advising Center
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Helping Your Student Succeed

From the day new students are admitted to Carroll, we're committed to providing them with the resources and tools that will help them achieve success. We believe that the support of family members is very important and we also know that no one wants your student to succeed as much as you do. There are many ways you can help our Academic Advisors put your student on the path to success.

Tips to Help Your Student with Advising

  • Read the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) so you are aware of the access you have to your student's educational records at Carroll University.
  • Ask your student if they know who their advisor is and how to contact the advisor.
  • Learn the name of your student's Academic Advisor and encourage them to make contact with the advisor when facing unusual situations such as an illness causing the student to miss several classes.
  • Encourage your student to make regular appointments with their advisor to review progress towards meeting academic, career, and personal goals.

Suggestions for Family Members of Exploring Students

  • Encourage your student to meet with their Academic Advisor at least two times per semester to help in the major decision-making process.
  • Talk with your student about the strengths you see or have seen in them.
  • Ask your student what their values are and why. Be open to their values being different from your own.
  • Encourage your student to try out new coursework in fields of study that are of interest or intriguing to them.
  • Discuss possible career fields your student is considering and encourage them to make contact with professionals in those fields to do job-shadowing or informational interviewing.
  • Encourage your student to seek out hands-on experiences in related work environments through getting involved with student organizations on campus, volunteer opportunities, part-time work or internships.
  • If your student makes a decision you question, listen, consider and discuss it.
  • Support your student in taking an active part in the self-discovery process.

Suggestions for Family Members of Major-Changing Students

  • Encourage your student to meet with an Academic Advisor at the Center for Academic Advising Services before changing their major.
  • Talk with your student about the strengths you see or have seen in them. Discuss how these strengths fit into the new major they are interested in.
  • Encourage your student to try out new coursework in the field of study they are interested in before changing their major.
  • Discuss possible career fields your student is considering and encourage them to make contacts with professionals in those fields to do job-shadowing or informational interviewing.
  • Encourage your student to seek out hands-on experiences in related work environments through getting involved with student organizations on campus, volunteer opportunities, part-time work or internships.
  • If your student makes a decision you question, listen, consider and discuss it.
  • Support your student in taking an active part in the self-discovery process.

Common Questions from Parents

Here are answers to common questions about the classes their student is taking and how they will achieve their degree.

Why is my student taking classes not related to their major?

During your student's time at Carroll, the majority of the courses they will be taking will be related to their major; however, they will also be required to complete a set of courses to fulfill the Pioneer Core General Education Requirements. For example, if your student is a Biology major with a Pre-Physical Therapy emphasis, they will be required to take at least one course from either Art, Music, or Theatre to fulfill their Fine Arts distribution area.

Is my student still going to be able to graduate if he/she changes their major?

Your student's time to graduation may be adjusted depending on:

  • When they change their major in their academic career. For example, did they change their major after their first semester at Carroll or after their Junior year?
  • If the new major require your student to be admitted to the program. For example, if your student is looking at changing their major to Nursing or Athletic Training, they will need to apply to the program after taking and completing (with appropriate grades) the prerequisite coursework.
  • The required coursework for their new major, since some majors at Carroll have fewer requirements than others. For example, changing to a Psychology major later in their academic career may not affect a student's time to graduation as much as changing to an Accounting major due to the fact that a Psychology major consists of 40 credits of required coursework compared to 80 credits required for the Accounting major. Regardless, every student is required to successfully complete at least 128 credits, the Pioneer Core General Education Curriculum, BS or BA Requirements and all required courses of at least one major before graduation.

Will the classes my student took previously be wasted if they change their major?

No. All courses students have earned credit in will count toward the graduation requirement of at least 128 credits. When a student changes majors, they do not lose any of the course credit they have earned at the collegiate level, any of the knowledge they have gained or the development that they have gone though. Each course, regardless of subject, teaches the student more than just the topic of study. When a student changes their major, they work with an Academic Advisor to talk through a new academic plan, how what they have taken benefits them, and what knowledge and skills they possess will work into the new major.

How many classes should my student be taking per year?

On average, we will typically advise students to take 16 credits per semester (or 32 credits per year) as this will keep them on track to reach the total of 128 credits needed to graduate in 4 years. If a student takes a lighter semester, maybe 12-14 credits, this may mean that they will need to take 1 or more semesters of 18 credits to stay on track to graduate in 4 years. Students can also take courses during Winter term or Summer terms to stay on track or earn credits toward their degree program of choice, which may help them be able to graduate in 4 years, even if they need more than 128 credits to graduate with their programs (major(s)/minor(s)) they would like to earn at Carroll.

How do I know my student is taking the classes they need? How can I make sure my student is doing what they need to in order to graduate?

To guarantee your student is taking the appropriate classes to fulfill their major, minor, degree, and Pioneer Core requirements, you can reference the Carroll University Undergraduate Catalog. However, urging your student to meet with their Academic Advisor 2-3 times per semester and keeping their academic plan up to date is the best way to support and empower your student to stay on track to their anticipated graduation date and earning the degree they are striving to complete.

Get answers to Common Questions from Students >>

 

Center for Academic Advising Services

125 Wright Street | 262-524-7410 | acadadvising@carrollu.edu

Fall and Spring Semester Hours: Monday - Thursday, 8 a.m. - 6 p.m., Friday, 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Summer and Winter Term Hours: Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

 
 
 
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